Health News

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Advancing Treatment of Advanced Lung Cancer
When cancer is described as “advanced,” that means it has started to spread.  Today, progress in understanding the origins of cancer and the development of new medications have improved patients' odds of living with and beyond advanced cancers.
FDA Approves Companion Diagnostic to Detect Gene Mutation
The US Food and Drug Administration today approved the cobas EGFR Mutation Test, a companion diagnostic for the cancer drug Tarceva (erlotinib).
Targeted Cancer Therapy Casts Wider Net
Targeting cancer gene mutations has been changing the way non-small cell lung cancer ( NSCLC ) is treated. As scientists learn more about the genetic makeup of tumors, more personalized therapy has become available.
An Alternative When Cancer Grows
When non-small cell lung cancer ( NSCLC ) grows again after shrinking on targeted therapy, patients may turn to chemotherapy. Adding local therapy to targeted drugs could offer another solution.
Never Too Late for Therapy
Older lung cancer patients who have not responded to standard chemotherapy may be reluctant to continue treatment. Later-stage drug treatment, however, can be effective. Older patients often go under-treated because of concerns that they will not be able to tolerate certain toxic therapies.
Blood Test Spots Who Benefits From Drug
The anti-cancer drug erlotinib ( Tarceva ) may slow or stop cancer depending on the type and extent of the disease. A blood test can help patients find out how they will respond to the drug.
A Welcome Skin Rash
For most people, getting a rash would not be good news. For elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, however, a rash may indicate a likelihood of living longer.
Doubling Progression-Free Survival
Being diagnosed with lung cancer usually means months of chemotherapy followed by a relapse. That outlook is changing for the better.